Posts Tagged ‘Steve Ness’

Succession Planning Workshops

Monday, January 16, 2017 @ 11:01 AM
Author: Peter Brehm

SCORE-Workshop-Succession Planning Series flyer

Together with SCORE and Northeast Bank, on March 2, 2017, and March 16, 2017, Business Law Center will be hosting two seminars geared towards helping small business owners protect their business, and improve the value of their business.

In Session 1, Succession Planning – Preparing to Leave Your Business, you will learn:

• Why should I have a plan?
• What happens to my business when I die?
• What happens if my partner dies, gets disabled, or divorced?
• How to get my business ready to sell?
• Could I sell my business now? And retire?
• How do I protect my family?
• How do I minimize taxes?

In Session 2, What’s Your Business Worth? you will learn:

• How can I determine the value of my business?
• What is the value of my goodwill?
• How do I decide how much insurance I need?
• What are my partners’ shares worth?
• Can I buy them out?
• Can my employees afford to buy me out?

For more information, and to register, you can go to SCORE’s website HERE or you can contact our office.

Peter Brehm

952-943-3904

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States Sue DOL on Overtime Changes

Friday, September 23, 2016 @ 09:09 AM
Author: Steven Ness

Officials from 21 states sued the U.S. Department of Labor Tuesday over a new rule that would, on December 1, 2016, make an estimated 4.2 million salaried workers (generally executive, administrative and professional employees) eligible for overtime pay. The protesting states are slamming the measure as a federal government overreach by the Obama Administration. Critics claim the measure will cripple small businesses.
States involved include Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Georgia, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Nebraska, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Texas, Utah and Wisconsin, and the governors of Iowa, Maine and New Mexico.

The Eastern Texas district where the lawsuit was filed is known as a “rocket docket” court where cases move along quickly.
The lawsuit came the same day that the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and more than 50 other business groups filed a legal challenge against the same regulation.

Reported by: MICHELLE RINDELS Associated Press
Read more at: http://www.startribune.com/21-us-states-sue-to-block-expansion-of-overtime-pay-law/394173931/

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New Minnesota Estate and Gift Tax Laws

Thursday, June 6, 2013 @ 10:06 AM
Author: Steven Ness

At the end of May the Minnesota Governor signed a bill into law that will impact people who reside in Minnesota and those who claim their residence in another state but own property in Minnesota.  Minnesota is now the second state (after Connecticut) to impose a gift tax. The new law also imposes a Minnesota estate tax for all property located in Minnesota held in pass-through entities (an LLC, Sub S Corp or partnership). Some key provisions provide:

  1. A Minnesota gift tax of 10 percent will be imposed on certain taxable gifts made by Minnesota residents and non-residents owning property located in Minnesota.

·         Beginning on June 30, 2013, Minnesota residents and non-residents will be subject to Minnesota gift tax on all transfers of real property located within Minnesota and transfers of tangible personal property that is customarily kept in Minnesota at the time the gift is executed. In addition, Minnesota residents will also be subject to Minnesota gift tax on transfers of intangible assets (e.g., cash, securities, business interests).

 ·         Each person has a lifetime exemption of $1,000,000 from the Minnesota gift tax. The Minnesota gift tax only applies to transfers that are treated as taxable gifts for federal gift tax purposes. As a result, certain gifts that are not subject to the federal gift tax – including transfers falling under the annual exclusion cap ($14,000 in 2013), gifts to spouses, charitable gifts and certain transfers for educational or medical purposes – will not be subject to the Minnesota gift tax.

 ·         This may be particularly important for people who have not yet taken advantage of their $5,000,000 federal gift, estate and generation-skipping transfer tax exemptions (indexed for inflation to $5,250,000 in 2013)

 

  1. Unlike many other states, Minnesota still has an estate tax on taxable estates that exceed $1,000,000 (with a top tax rate of 16%). Beginning in 2013, individuals who die resident in Minnesota or those who own property located in Minnesota will be required to include in their Minnesota taxable estate taxable gifts made within 3 years of death.

 

  1. For people dying after December 31, 2012, who own a pass-through entity (such as an LLC, S Corp or partnership) the location of real or tangible personal property held in the entity will be determined as though the entity does not exist. This means that property located in Minnesota held in pass-through entities will be subject to estate tax.

 ·      Under prior law, a non-resident owner of an interest in a pass-through entity that owned real estate, inventory or equipment in Minnesota was not subject to Minnesota estate tax on that property. The new law will subject such property to Minnesota estate tax, even if the business owner or investor has no other connection to Minnesota and even if the business entity is organized and operated in another state.

·         Non-Minnesota residents who may have previously transferred Minnesota situated property to a pass-through entity, in order to avoid the Minnesota estate tax, should to review these transfers. This is no longer an effective way to reduce or avoid Minnesota estate taxes.

·         Since the new law does not apply to Minnesota-situated property owned by C Corporations people owning pass through entities will want to consider whether a conversion to a C Corporation is appropriate.

At this point in time, the new law does not include a similar provision for Minnesota gift tax. After June 30, non-residents may be able to continue making gifts of interests in pass-through entities owning Minnesota property, without triggering a Minnesota gift tax. It must be remembered that any such gifts made within 3 years of death will be included in the gifting individual’s Minnesota taxable estate. People who desire to complete gifts of Minnesota situated assets should consider doing so as soon as possible.  It is anticipated by many that the Minnesota gift tax provisions will be modified to align with the new Minnesota estate tax provisions in one of the next legislative sessions.

 

 

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