Posts Tagged ‘minnesota tax planning’

Proposed IRS Regulations May Eliminate Valuation Discounts for Gifts of Family Ownership

Sunday, September 18, 2016 @ 10:09 AM
Author: Peter Brehm

On August 4, 2016, the IRS published in the Federal Register a set of proposed new regulations under Chapter 14, Section 2704 of the Internal Revenue Code. These proposed regulations would have a significant impact on the valuation of private business entity interests for transfer tax (estate, gift, and generation-skipping) purposes.  Currently, business appraisers will examine real world restrictions on ownership interests (such as limitations of voting rights, control, etc.), and will often apply significant discounts to stock that is gifted to family members.  The discounts are intended to reflect the reality that potential buyers will pay less for stock that is restricted than it will for stock that is not restricted.
Under the proposed regulations, appraisers would be required to conduct valuations assuming hypothetical circumstances that often do not coincide with market conditions.  In other words, appraisers would be expected to assume that restrictions of the stock being transferred do not exist. This would cause them to determine a fair market value that ignores otherwise applicable valuation discounts, resulting in a value determination that may not match what the market would actually pay.
If these regulations are enacted in December 2017 as planned, valuation discounts for transfer interests will essentially be eliminated.  This will redefine how these interests are valued and most likely limit the financial benefits of these transfers.  The proposed changes would affect anyone who plans to transfer equity interests to family members. It is essential to approach this process in the company of a seasoned business valuation expert who is adept at navigating the complex authorities in action during these transfers.

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New Minnesota Estate and Gift Tax Laws

Thursday, June 6, 2013 @ 10:06 AM
Author: Steven Ness

At the end of May the Minnesota Governor signed a bill into law that will impact people who reside in Minnesota and those who claim their residence in another state but own property in Minnesota.  Minnesota is now the second state (after Connecticut) to impose a gift tax. The new law also imposes a Minnesota estate tax for all property located in Minnesota held in pass-through entities (an LLC, Sub S Corp or partnership). Some key provisions provide:

  1. A Minnesota gift tax of 10 percent will be imposed on certain taxable gifts made by Minnesota residents and non-residents owning property located in Minnesota.

·         Beginning on June 30, 2013, Minnesota residents and non-residents will be subject to Minnesota gift tax on all transfers of real property located within Minnesota and transfers of tangible personal property that is customarily kept in Minnesota at the time the gift is executed. In addition, Minnesota residents will also be subject to Minnesota gift tax on transfers of intangible assets (e.g., cash, securities, business interests).

 ·         Each person has a lifetime exemption of $1,000,000 from the Minnesota gift tax. The Minnesota gift tax only applies to transfers that are treated as taxable gifts for federal gift tax purposes. As a result, certain gifts that are not subject to the federal gift tax – including transfers falling under the annual exclusion cap ($14,000 in 2013), gifts to spouses, charitable gifts and certain transfers for educational or medical purposes – will not be subject to the Minnesota gift tax.

 ·         This may be particularly important for people who have not yet taken advantage of their $5,000,000 federal gift, estate and generation-skipping transfer tax exemptions (indexed for inflation to $5,250,000 in 2013)

 

  1. Unlike many other states, Minnesota still has an estate tax on taxable estates that exceed $1,000,000 (with a top tax rate of 16%). Beginning in 2013, individuals who die resident in Minnesota or those who own property located in Minnesota will be required to include in their Minnesota taxable estate taxable gifts made within 3 years of death.

 

  1. For people dying after December 31, 2012, who own a pass-through entity (such as an LLC, S Corp or partnership) the location of real or tangible personal property held in the entity will be determined as though the entity does not exist. This means that property located in Minnesota held in pass-through entities will be subject to estate tax.

 ·      Under prior law, a non-resident owner of an interest in a pass-through entity that owned real estate, inventory or equipment in Minnesota was not subject to Minnesota estate tax on that property. The new law will subject such property to Minnesota estate tax, even if the business owner or investor has no other connection to Minnesota and even if the business entity is organized and operated in another state.

·         Non-Minnesota residents who may have previously transferred Minnesota situated property to a pass-through entity, in order to avoid the Minnesota estate tax, should to review these transfers. This is no longer an effective way to reduce or avoid Minnesota estate taxes.

·         Since the new law does not apply to Minnesota-situated property owned by C Corporations people owning pass through entities will want to consider whether a conversion to a C Corporation is appropriate.

At this point in time, the new law does not include a similar provision for Minnesota gift tax. After June 30, non-residents may be able to continue making gifts of interests in pass-through entities owning Minnesota property, without triggering a Minnesota gift tax. It must be remembered that any such gifts made within 3 years of death will be included in the gifting individual’s Minnesota taxable estate. People who desire to complete gifts of Minnesota situated assets should consider doing so as soon as possible.  It is anticipated by many that the Minnesota gift tax provisions will be modified to align with the new Minnesota estate tax provisions in one of the next legislative sessions.

 

 

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It May Be Time to Review Your Estate Plan

Wednesday, March 6, 2013 @ 09:03 AM
Author: Steven Ness

For more than a decade the estate planning landscape has been foggy at best.  During that entire period, existing laws created “automatic” changes that many tax and legal professionals found difficult to predict.  The passing of the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 (the “2012 Act”) at the close of 2012, finally makes the estate and gift tax laws “permanent,” meaning that they are not scheduled to expire, be repealed or rolled back. This is a significant change because since 2001 taxpayers and their advisers have had to plan based on an uncertain statutory framework.

The 2012 Act sets the estate tax exemption amount at $5 million. This is the amount of money that can pass estate tax free to any individual without triggering federal estate tax.  Since this exemption amount will be adjusted for inflation, the exemption amount in 2012 was actually $5.12 million and it is predicted to rise to $5.25 million this year.

The 2012 Act unifies the estate tax with the gift tax, making the lifetime gift tax exemption amount also equal to $5 million (adjusted for inflation). The generation-skipping tax (“GST”) exemption amount is also set at $5 million (adjusted for inflation). As a result, a person can gift over $5 million during life ($10 million between spouses) and not trigger any transfer tax.

The maximum estate and gift tax rate was increased from 35% to 40%.

The “portability” of exemptions between spouses has been permanently extended so that a surviving spouse will be able to utilize his or her last deceased spouse’s unused exemption amount. This does require the filing of a federal estate tax return, but with proper elections built into a carefully prepared estate plan, a surviving spouse can protect up to $10 million (adjusted for inflation) if his or her deceased spouse did not utilize any of his or her exclusion amounts.

While the exemption amounts are high and portability enables a surviving spouse to use both spouses’ exemptions, there are still many reasons why planning during life is very important, including:

  1. All appreciation on gifted assets escapes federal and state estate taxes. For this reason, it still may make sense to make lifetime gifts if you anticipate that assets may appreciate and/or grow to a level that exceeds the exemption amounts.
  2. While the federal exemption amount is $5 million, the Minnesota estate tax exemption amount is still $1 million. A $10 million estate may not be subject to federal estate tax but will be subject to approximately $1 million in Minnesota estate tax.  Proper planning can reduce or eliminate this $1 million state estate tax exposure.
  3. While the estate tax exemption is portable, the state level estate tax exemption and the federal GST exemption are not portable. If not properly planned for, these valuable exemptions can be wasted, costing significant tax dollars.

Steven E. Ness is an estate planning attorney for Business Law Center, PLC in Bloomington, Minnesota.

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Tax Savings for Companies Selling in Foreign Countries

Friday, February 1, 2013 @ 01:02 PM
Author: Steven Ness

An Interest Charge Domestic International Sales Corporation (commonly called an “IC-DISC”) is a unique tax savings entity, available to U.S. companies that have substantial sales to foreign countries, which includes sales to Canada and Mexico. An IC-DISC reduces tax liability by converting a portion of export income, which is taxable at ordinary income rates as high as 35% into qualified dividends generally taxed at 15%.

In short, an IC-DISC is a tax-exempt, domestic “paper” C corporation set up to receive commissions on the company’s export sales. The IC-DISC must have its own bank account, keep separate accounting records and file U.S. tax returns. But this separate entity need not have an office, employees or tangible assets nor is it required to perform any services.

To qualify as and IC-DISC a U.S. corporation must:

1. Be incorporated in one of the 50 states or District of Columbia;
2. File an election with the IRS to be treated as an IC-DISC for federal tax purposes (the application can be found at http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/i1120icd.pdf);
3. Maintain a minimum capitalization of $2,500;
4. Have a single class of stock;
5. Meet a qualified export receipts test and a qualified export assets test;

Meeting a qualified export receipts test and a qualified export assets test indicates that at least 95% of an IC-DISC’s gross receipts and assets must be related to the export of property whose value is at least 50% attributable to U.S. produced content. Some services, such as engineering and architectural services related to construction projects outside the U.S. may also generate qualified export receipts.

The internal processes followed by an IC-DISC can be summarized as follows:

1. An owner-managed exporting company organizes a new C corporation and applies for qualification as a tax-exempt IC-DISC;
2. The exporting company pays IC-DISC a commission;
3. The exporting company deducts commission from ordinary income taxed at 35%;
4. The IC-DISC pays no tax on the commission;
5. The shareholders of the IC-DISC must pay income tax on dividends at a qualified rate of 15%;
6. The result is 20 percent tax savings on commissions.

Steven E. Ness is a busienss attorney with Business Law Center in Minneapolis Minnesota

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Tax Plans Must Have A Business Purpose, and Sometimes Even Tax Attorneys End Up in Jail

Friday, September 14, 2012 @ 10:09 AM
Author: Peter Brehm

When I was in the mire of my tax education I was presented with this seemingly contradictory reality:

1. Congress creates rules in the tax code (including deductions and credits) to encourage businesses to engage in specific types of conduct (buy certain products, hire certain types of employees, or provide specific benefits); and

2. Congress (and the IRS) also creates rule prohibiting businesses from claiming those tax benefits unless there is a substantial business purpose for the transaction other than tax savings.

One of the frustrating parts of tax planning is coming to grips with the idea that Congress wants to control your behavior with rewards, but then denies you the reward if they find out that you only did it for the money. Its a bit like offering someone $1,000 to be your friend, and then refusing to pay them when you find out that they only liked you for your money. So the game becomes convincing the IRS that you love their sense of humor and just as much as (if not more than) their deductions.

Successful business owners are like gold to tax planning consultants because they have the two things that all tax planners need: taxable income and a desire to send less of that income to the government. As a result, the more successful you are, the greater the chance that you will find yourself in contact with an army of tax planners and consultants. Tax planners (and tax attorneys) range from conservative (declare all income at the highest possible tax rate), moderately creative (use the plain language of the tax code to reduce taxes within the letter of the law), aggressively creative (expand the possible meaning of the code, and fill in gaps of the code to aggressively reduce taxes), to criminally creative (knowingly engaging in planning and conduct that is contrary to the law to avoid taxes at all costs).

Its not always easy to tell which kind of adviser you are dealing with, but the line you should never cross (and a clear indication that you are entering the world of the criminal planner) is a fairly bright one: would I do this transaction if I wouldn’t save taxes? If the answer is yes, then you are probably fine. If the answer is a resounding NO, there is a good chance that something is amiss, and that you should speak with a lawyer (unrelated to the people selling you their plan) about the transaction. For example, would you take all of your liquid assets, transfer them into a trust controlled by someone you don’t know in another country, who then deposits the funds in a third world bank? If you can think of a good reason for your business to do that, and you were going to do that anyway, any tax benefits will probably be appropriate. If the primary, if not exclusive, reason was to save taxes then tough times may be ahead.

Often times these people will have already anticipated your objections, and may present you with a letter from a reputable lawyer or accounting firm to alleviate your fears. Rather than calm you, let me suggest that this is exactly the time to reach out to a qualified tax lawyer who has no stake in the proposed transaction. Why? Because some lawyers (and I am going to shock some of you here) are not particularly ethical.

Yesterday a lawyer out of Chicago pled guilty to conspiracy and tax evasion (in a scheme in which she made $1.6 Millon). Her crime? Knowingly writing false tax opinion letters. In those letters, the attorney opined that transactions without any purpose other than tax avoidance had “a substantial business purpose”. The client needed the letter to justify a transaction that was solely for tax avoidance and the lawyer was willing to write the letter for money. Now, they are all going to prison. Here is a copy of the plea agreement if you have ever wanted to see one.

There are a LOT of very good and ethical tax planners in this country, with a LOT of very good and creative tax planning ideas and opportunities. And to be very clear, the tax code is almost beyond common sense comprehension, and some of the best legal and tax minds will disagree among themselves about what the code does and should say. So nearly all tax planning, even good faith conservative planning, has some level of risk associate with it. But there are three things I want people to understand: 1. whatever planning you do should generally be tied to a purpose beyond tax savings; 2. there are professionals who will advise you to take a tax benefit you are not entitled to so that they can make money off of your money; and 3. when you enter into those kind of transactions, no matter how many letters you have saying it was OK, everyone can end up in jail.

Peter Brehm is a tax attorney practicing with the Business Law Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota and Scottsdale, Arizona.

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Coming Tax Changes Will Affect Small Business Owners

Saturday, June 30, 2012 @ 09:06 AM
Author: Peter Brehm

While it is hard to eliminate a tax, it seems less difficult to eliminate deductions and increase tax  rates.   There were a number of significant change that are effective this year, and even more that will impact you in 2013.

Among tax provisions that expired at the end of 2011 are the following:

  1. The so-called “AMT patch.” As result, an estimated 27 million more taxpayers are subject to the Alternative Minimum Tax this year.
  2. The deduction for state and local sales taxes.  About 11 million taxpayers claimed this deduction last year.
  3. The deduction for mortgage insurance premiums.  About four million taxpayers recently claimed this deduction.
  4. A provision allowing persons over age 70-1/2 to make tax-free withdrawals from their Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs) to make charitable contributions.

The IRS believes that Congress is likely to extend many of these and other expired provisions retroactive to January 1, 2012, but neither taxpayers nor the IRS know for certain what will happen and therefore cannot make plans.  For example, a home-buyer trying to decide whether to utilize a loan package that includes mortgage insurance now lacks important information.  So does a pensioner trying to decide whether to tap his IRA to make a charitable donation.

An even larger number of provisions are set to expire at the end of 2012, including the Bush-era cuts in marginal tax rates, reduced tax rates on dividends and long-term capital gains, various marriage penalty relief provisions, certain components of the child tax credit, the earned income tax credit, and the adoption credit, and the moratoria on the phase-outs of itemized deductions and personal exemptions.

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