Posts Tagged ‘gift stock’

Proposed IRS Regulations May Eliminate Valuation Discounts for Gifts of Family Ownership

Sunday, September 18, 2016 @ 10:09 AM
Author: Peter Brehm

On August 4, 2016, the IRS published in the Federal Register a set of proposed new regulations under Chapter 14, Section 2704 of the Internal Revenue Code. These proposed regulations would have a significant impact on the valuation of private business entity interests for transfer tax (estate, gift, and generation-skipping) purposes.  Currently, business appraisers will examine real world restrictions on ownership interests (such as limitations of voting rights, control, etc.), and will often apply significant discounts to stock that is gifted to family members.  The discounts are intended to reflect the reality that potential buyers will pay less for stock that is restricted than it will for stock that is not restricted.
Under the proposed regulations, appraisers would be required to conduct valuations assuming hypothetical circumstances that often do not coincide with market conditions.  In other words, appraisers would be expected to assume that restrictions of the stock being transferred do not exist. This would cause them to determine a fair market value that ignores otherwise applicable valuation discounts, resulting in a value determination that may not match what the market would actually pay.
If these regulations are enacted in December 2017 as planned, valuation discounts for transfer interests will essentially be eliminated.  This will redefine how these interests are valued and most likely limit the financial benefits of these transfers.  The proposed changes would affect anyone who plans to transfer equity interests to family members. It is essential to approach this process in the company of a seasoned business valuation expert who is adept at navigating the complex authorities in action during these transfers.

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Gifting Stock: Use a Formula, Not a Savings Clause

Thursday, August 9, 2012 @ 02:08 PM
Author: Peter Brehm

Small business owners often struggle finding ways to transfer the value of what they have built to their children and grandchildren.  The current tax law permits a parent to gift $13,000 to each child without paying gift tax.  So, for example, a husband and wife with 4 children could gift $26,000 in stock every year to each child ($104,000 per year) without paying tax.   As most small business owners know, however, establishing the value of small business stock is not easy to do, and if the IRS decides that the amount of stock you gave exceeds the annual exclusion amount, there is the potential for a rather punitive gift tax.

Many practitioners have tried to remedy this situation by adding a ‘savings clause’ to the gift that says: we are gifting X number of shares to each child with the expectation that the value of the shares does not exceed the gift tax exclusion amount, and if the IRS finds that  X number of shares exceeds the gift tax exclusion amount, we take back enough of the gift so that no tax is owed.  The IRS, and most court have rejected this approach.

However, the Tax Court has held that a gift of stock based upon a formula, where the gift is for a set dollar amount (not a specific number of shares) the taxpayer can effectively create a gift that will never exceed the exclusion amount.  In Wandry v. Commissioner, the court held that “[a] savings clause is void because it creates a donor that tries ‘to take property back’.  On the other hand, a ‘formula clause’ is valid because it merely transfers a ‘fixed set of rights with uncertain value’.  The difference depends on an understanding of just what the donor is trying to give away.”

For the small business owner the solution is clear: when planning around the gift tax exclusion, you should use a formula based gift, not a savings clause.

Peter Brehm is a small business and estate lawyer practicing in Minneapolis, Minnesota and Scottsdale, Arizona.

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Will Minnesota Tax Your Estate?

Tuesday, July 10, 2012 @ 08:07 AM
Author: Steven Ness

The State of Minnesota imposes a tax on the estates of individuals who are residents of the state when they die or who own tangible property in MN when they die. The taxable estate is generally the fair market value of the estate on the day the decedent died, less deductions (e.g., transfers to a surviving spouse and charitable bequests) and an exemption mount, which is $1 million for unmarried individuals. The tax is imposed under a graduated rate schedule on the taxable estate.  The tax rates range from 0.8% to 16%. For the 16 years ending December 31, 2001, the MN estate tax was directly linked to the federal tax as a “pickup” or “soak-up” tax equal to the credit allowed under federal estate tax for state death taxes. As a pickup tax, the MN tax imposed no additional tax burden on estates. For each dollar of state tax paid, federal tax was reduced by an equal amount.

However, U.S. Congress repealed this credit in 2001, the MN legislature chose to continue imposing the estate tax under the rules in effect before Congress repealed the credit. As a result, the MN estate tax now is a stand-alone tax.  Many people, including some estate planning practitioners, drafted their estate plan around the federal estate tax and ignored the impact of Minnesota’s estate tax rules.  All estate plans, especially estate plans created prior to 2002, should be reviewed, and may need to be modified to recognize Minnesota’s lower taxable estate threshold.

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