Succession Planning Workshops

Monday, January 16, 2017 @ 11:01 AM
Author: Peter Brehm

SCORE-Workshop-Succession Planning Series flyer

Together with SCORE and Northeast Bank, on March 2, 2017, and March 16, 2017, Business Law Center will be hosting two seminars geared towards helping small business owners protect their business, and improve the value of their business.

In Session 1, Succession Planning – Preparing to Leave Your Business, you will learn:

• Why should I have a plan?
• What happens to my business when I die?
• What happens if my partner dies, gets disabled, or divorced?
• How to get my business ready to sell?
• Could I sell my business now? And retire?
• How do I protect my family?
• How do I minimize taxes?

In Session 2, What’s Your Business Worth? you will learn:

• How can I determine the value of my business?
• What is the value of my goodwill?
• How do I decide how much insurance I need?
• What are my partners’ shares worth?
• Can I buy them out?
• Can my employees afford to buy me out?

For more information, and to register, you can go to SCORE’s website HERE or you can contact our office.

Peter Brehm

952-943-3904

off

 

The Revised Uniform Fiduciary Access to Digital Assets Act (RUFADAA) has swiftly expanded across the country, and has already been enacted in 32 states including Minnesota in August 2016. The RUFADAA places the responsibilities of properly planning for digital property on estate professionals. A common misconception is that this law automatically allows fiduciaries access to review accounts. This simply is not true, and blanket digital executor language in the estate documents will not be recognized by site owners.

Personal accounts: Many recent changes.  In 1995, the average American had 10 traditional accounts (savings, checking, credit cards, merchant accounts, etc.).  Today, that same population has 130 different digital and traditional accounts.

Estate administration is undergoing a sea change. Digital assets are creating new challenges. I see more and more estate planning clients coming to me with an increasing number of personal accounts and they’re unclear what to do with them. Clients have everything from financial accounts to travel rewards programs to social and professional networks online with no method of managing them. There’s risk of any number of these accounts becoming hidden or forgotten during estate administration, leaving loved ones to deal with finding and closing them. I see personal representatives left with the task of re-opening and finalizing an estate they thought was settled.

Loved ones are left confused. Navigating the complex requirements of tracking down and notifying the myriad of personal accounts can be overwhelming and complicated. The multitude of accounts, lack of awareness of their existence and not knowing where to turn result in procrastination and avoidance. This can potentially become a breeding ground for identification theft and fraud. It’s an emotional and logistical nightmare leading to incomplete estate administration as well as potential liability.

The needs of our estate planning clients are changing. The proliferation of digital technology (and its adoption by all generations) is changing the role of the estate planning attorney. Legislation and regulation in this area are being introduced to guide estate planning attorneys. Our clients count on us for effective estate planning and administration. We are remiss in our responsibilities if we fail to be proactive in ensuring the proper handling of all types of accounts. Effective planning and peace of mind are critical but now must also include digital assets to complete their portfolio of off-line assets. My clients and my reputation demand more.

We need solutions. Clients aren’t aware of the impact hidden accounts may have on their estate nor do they have the resources available to properly plan for them. DCS provides me the opportunity to offer an efficient, cost effective way to keep track of and ultimately close or resolve accounts in the manner my clients wish.

Facts:

  • Non-account holders using passwords can be in violation of state and federal regulations.
  • Sharing passwords can encourage the breach of account holder agreement and is unsecure.
  • The custodian’s terms of agreement may prevail over a court order. Custodians determine approval for access to accounts. Once an account is closed, all account contents may no longer available. To ensure disclosure, consent must be clear & express by the living account holder.
  • Cash-value assets can be hidden almost anywhere, including online storage, email, e-commerce or even in a gaming account.
  • Americans 65 and older spend an average of 4+ hours daily online.

Fictions:

  • The estate is authorized to use the account holder’s password to access their digital account.
  • Recommending that clients provide passwords to friends and family is a best practices.
  • A court order will always give access to digital account contents.
  • Closing an account and account content requests are the same.
  • Digital assets can wait to be dealt with until the time of death. Only financial institutions hold cash-value
  • Digital estate management is just for younger

 

Fiduciaries that may be granted rights:

  • Personal Representatives;
  • Conservators;
  • Agents acting pursuant to a power of attorney;

Each of the above categories of fiduciaries is subject to different opt-in and default rules based on the presumed intent of the account holder and the applicability of other state and federal laws.

Under the Act, a personal representative is presumed to have access to all of the decedent’s digital assets unless that is contrary to the decedent’s will or to other applicable law. A conservator may access the assets pursuant to a court order. An agent acting pursuant to a power of attorney is presumed to have access to all of a principal’s digital assets not subject to the protections of other applicable law; if another law protects the asset, then the power of attorney must explicitly grant access. And a trustee may access any digital asset held by the trust unless that is contrary to the terms of the trust or to other applicable law.

 

Additional/Optional POA Clause:

_____   (N)           digital property management and transactions as defined in Minnesota Statutes, Section 523.24, or applicable Fiduciary Access to Digital Assets Act.

Increased Estate Tax Exemption

Thursday, June 1, 2017 @ 06:06 PM
Author: kayla.muchka

The new state budget has increased the estate tax exemption from $1.8 million to $2.1 million retroactive to January 1stof this year. This increase will continue to $2.4 million in 2018, $2.7 million in 2019, and $3 million for 2020 and later. The wealthiest 1,000 estates in Minnesota will see a significant tax cut over the next few years.

Alternative Financing for Small Businesses

Saturday, May 27, 2017 @ 10:05 AM
Author: kayla.muchka

Metropolitan Consortium of Community Developers (MCCD) is a network of nonprofits that provide small loans and financial advisement to small business owners in the metro area, in addition to affordable housing development. MCCD has loaned over $6.7 million to over 550 entrepreneurs for start-up and expansion projects. There are five focus areas that MCCD works with. The programs include advising, lending, emerging leaders, and owning a home. Requirements for each program and possible membership can be found at www.mccdmn.org. The website also provides ways for community members to get involved or receive the weekly “Rundown” newsletter.

 

Preparing Your Business for Sale

Thursday, January 12, 2017 @ 10:01 AM
Author: Peter Brehm

I have been working with small businesses for nearly 20 years, and I can’t say how often I have seen sellers leave money on the table because they hadn’t prepared their business for sale.  People buying small businesses are usually looking to buy a job, and are seeking confidence that they can make your business work for them.  The more turn-key the business, the better it will be for the buyer.  Which is why franchises are so successful. 

If you think you will be selling your business one day (and you probably will), here are some basic steps you can take to help make your business easier to sell, and make it more valuable.

1.      Eliminate the Black Box.  Obviously, buyers want to know if your business is making money, but presenting a potential buyer with historic EBITDA, revenue, or cash flow numbers is not enough. Buyers aren’t buying your profits from last year, they are buying the profits they might earn in the future.  If they don’t feel confident that they will be able to replicate what you earned, they will pay less for your business.  Be prepared to explain not just what your business made, but exactly how sales, marketing, equipment, suppliers, customers, intellectual property, and labor contributed to your profits.  You are, after all, the world’s foremost expert on your business, and should be able to explain how it runs in detail.  When buyers can see how your business makes money, they will be more confident that they can make money too. 

2.      Eliminate You from Your Business.  Think about your business as a money printing engine.  If a buyer purchased that engine, would it run efficiently without you, or are you the only one that knows how to prime it, or where the throttle is?  As a small business owner, of course you are vital to your business, but you must take steps demonstrating to a potential buyer that the engine will run efficiently without you.  Help you buyer visualize your business without you.  Identify key employees, and start delegating responsibilities to those people.  Prepare a transition plan that explains how you will help train and mentor your buyer in your business.  Communicate to your buyer exactly how he will be able to retain your key customers, vendors, and employees. 

3.      Clean up Your Books I.  When you own a small business, and there is enough money coming in to cover your expenses and pay expected profits, there is little incentive to keep great looking books.  But your profit and loss statement (P&L) and balance sheet say a lot about your business, and speak volumes about your attention to detail.  When a client presents me with financial statements prepared by a professional accounting firm, my confidence in those numbers goes up.  If all they have are tax returns, or some hastily assembled P&L, my confidence goes down, and I will generally advise my client to either walk away, or make some ridiculously low offer.  With the advent of QuickBooks, and other online accounting packages, there is simply no good reason why you should have bad books.  Hire a good bookkeeper or accountant, and get your books in order.   

4.      Clean up Your Books II.  I get it, you are a small business owner and you want some of the perks of owning a small business.  So, you decide to buy a building and have your company pay (mildly excessive) rent to you.  You hired your son to be your bookkeeper for $75,000 a year in stead of paying a bookkeeper $10,000.  You bought a company condo in Florida, and decided that the company could really use a yacht and a Porsche 918 to run (business related) errands.  I’m not here to judge (well maybe I am a little), but if those expenses are on your books when you present your P&L to a buyer, you are shooting yourself in the foot.  When you are getting ready to sell, stop thinking about reducing your tax bill (and living like a Rockefeller), and clean up your books.  Get a real estate agent to give you’re the market value of your rent.  Reduce salaries paid to family members to market rate (or just hire someone else).  Eliminate all non-business related expenses from your business.  Your books should reflect the most efficient operation of your business to get you a better return.

5.      Make Your Business Shiny.  Quick question:  who has more leverage, a person who looks like they must sell, or a person who looks like they don’t have to sell?  Years ago, I worked with a man who owned a restaurant and decided that he was going leave his business in a couple years.   So, for close to three years he spent next to nothing to fix his equipment, his furniture, his fixtures or anything else.  When buyer came around and saw the mess that was waiting for them (torn carpets, ovens on their last legs, dated furniture, and worn out fixtures), it directly reduced what they were willing to pay.  More importantly, the buyers knew that the seller had to sell, otherwise he would have to absorb the costs of updating the FF&E.  He had painted himself in a corner.  When you present your business for sale, it should look like you could run it for another 10 years if you wanted to.  Operate your business as if you will never sell, until you do.  Keep your vital equipment in good repair, replace worn fixtures, keep employment agreements up to date, enforce non-compete agreements, protect your copyrights and trademarks, and update your vendor and customer agreements. 

There are, of course, more things you can do, and each industry has other steps that might be useful. But, if you can take simple steps that will give potential buyers confidence that they can replicate the success of your business, you will  be more likely to sell your business and get paid fairly for it.

Peter C. Brehm, J.D., LL.M., CVA

off

Business Transfers and Changing Tax Rules

Wednesday, December 7, 2016 @ 10:12 AM
Author: Steven Ness

Last Thursday, December 1, 2016, there was a hearing before IRS regulators concerning the potential elimination of discounting the value of transferred business interests, a significant estate planning business succession technique often used in the transfer of closely held or family owned businesses.
In October, the IRS has issued proposed regulations to Section 2704 of the Internal Revenue Code that could dramatically reduce the ability to utilize well accepted discounting techniques used in valuing business interests being transferred. Specifically, these proposed regulations would likely restrict the application of “lack of control” or “lack of marketability” discounts when determining the value of the business interest being transferred. The loss of this technique creates serious tax implications, affecting taxation of capital gains, gift tax exemptions and estate taxes.
Although the 2016 federal estate tax exemption is $5,450,000, per person, that cap is subject to change by either congressional or Presidential pressure. If long recognized discounting method, relating to the accepted value of transferred business interests is lost, owners of family and closely held business could be paying more taxes as a result of a business transfer.
Since 1990, when Section 2704 was enacted by Congress, the IRS has attempted to close estate and gift discounting. Until now, that attempt by the IRS has been unsuccessful. The new proposed regulations use the authority granted under Section 2704(b)(4), which gives the IRS the authority to provide in regulations in determining the value of the transfer of any interest in a corporation or partnership to a member of the transferor’s family, if such restriction has the effect of reducing the value of the transferred interest . . . but does not ultimately reduce the value of such interest to the transferee.”
There are questions as to whether the proposed regulations exceed the regulatory authority of the IRS, and while the promulgation of these regulations will likely be challenged, that challenge would be well after the proposed regulations are effective.
If these changes are adopted as written, they will have a direct impact on estate planning considerations for owners of family controlled entities. These new regulations will effectively eliminate discounts for lack of control or marketability in valuing these interests. While there may still time to complete transfers before the proposed regulations become effective, that preemptive planning may be for naught. If planning individual dies within three years of the transfer and after the new regulations are effective, the transfer could still be taxed under these new regulations.
It is however, a double-edged sword. Given that the current federal estate tax exemption is $5,450,000, there is only a limited population that will ever be subject to this federal estate tax. That limited application of federal estate taxes, coupled with the current step-up in basis rules, benefits tax payers, who cannot be subjected to the taxing authorities attempts to apply discounts to that stepped-up bases. As an example, a business owner who dies and passes his or her business interest to the next generation, passes along a business interest with a higher value, providing an increased step-up in basis.

off

DOL Overtime Rule Changes on Hold

Wednesday, November 23, 2016 @ 10:11 AM
Author: Steven Ness

U.S. Department of Labor’s new unlegislated rules (to become effective on December 1) regarding overtime pay were indefinitely halted.  On November 22, 2016, a federal judge temporarily blocked the Department of Labor from implementing and enforcing a final rule that would have altered the way workers are classified as exempt from overtime pay under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).  A temporary sigh of relief for many small and medium sized businesses with “hybrid executives” who perform a variety of tasks/functions.

While this means the implementation of the rule has been delayed, and it will not go into effect on December 1, 2016 as expected, it could easily be implemented in the near future. Proactive employers that already implemented policies consistent with the new rules may have a difficult time reversing those new policies.  It is always prudent, if unsure, to consult legal counsel for additional guidance.

off

States Sue DOL on Overtime Changes

Friday, September 23, 2016 @ 09:09 AM
Author: Steven Ness

Officials from 21 states sued the U.S. Department of Labor Tuesday over a new rule that would, on December 1, 2016, make an estimated 4.2 million salaried workers (generally executive, administrative and professional employees) eligible for overtime pay. The protesting states are slamming the measure as a federal government overreach by the Obama Administration. Critics claim the measure will cripple small businesses.
States involved include Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Georgia, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Nebraska, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Texas, Utah and Wisconsin, and the governors of Iowa, Maine and New Mexico.

The Eastern Texas district where the lawsuit was filed is known as a “rocket docket” court where cases move along quickly.
The lawsuit came the same day that the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and more than 50 other business groups filed a legal challenge against the same regulation.

Reported by: MICHELLE RINDELS Associated Press
Read more at: http://www.startribune.com/21-us-states-sue-to-block-expansion-of-overtime-pay-law/394173931/

off

Seminars on Business Valuation and Buy-Sell Agreements

Thursday, September 22, 2016 @ 12:09 PM
Author: Peter Brehm

At Business Law Center, we we do a number of things to help small business owners plan for the future. In conjunction with SCORE and Northeast Bank, on October 27, and November 3, 2016, we will be hosting two seminars geared towards helping small business owners protect their business, and improve the value of their business.

In Session 1, Succession Planning – Preparing to Leave Your Business, you will learn:

• Why should I have a plan?
• What happens to my business when I die?
• What happens if my partner dies, gets disabled, or divorced?
• How to get my business ready to sell?
• Could I sell my business now? And retire?
• How do I protect my family?
• How do I minimize taxes?

In Session 2, What’s Your Business Worth? you will learn:

• How can I determine the value of my business?
• What is the value of my goodwill?
• How do I decide how much insurance I need?
• What are my partners’ shares worth?
• Can I buy them out?
• Can my employees afford to buy me out?

For more information, and to register, you must go to SCORE’s website HERE.

off

Proposed IRS Regulations May Eliminate Valuation Discounts for Gifts of Family Ownership

Sunday, September 18, 2016 @ 10:09 AM
Author: Peter Brehm

On August 4, 2016, the IRS published in the Federal Register a set of proposed new regulations under Chapter 14, Section 2704 of the Internal Revenue Code. These proposed regulations would have a significant impact on the valuation of private business entity interests for transfer tax (estate, gift, and generation-skipping) purposes.  Currently, business appraisers will examine real world restrictions on ownership interests (such as limitations of voting rights, control, etc.), and will often apply significant discounts to stock that is gifted to family members.  The discounts are intended to reflect the reality that potential buyers will pay less for stock that is restricted than it will for stock that is not restricted.
Under the proposed regulations, appraisers would be required to conduct valuations assuming hypothetical circumstances that often do not coincide with market conditions.  In other words, appraisers would be expected to assume that restrictions of the stock being transferred do not exist. This would cause them to determine a fair market value that ignores otherwise applicable valuation discounts, resulting in a value determination that may not match what the market would actually pay.
If these regulations are enacted in December 2017 as planned, valuation discounts for transfer interests will essentially be eliminated.  This will redefine how these interests are valued and most likely limit the financial benefits of these transfers.  The proposed changes would affect anyone who plans to transfer equity interests to family members. It is essential to approach this process in the company of a seasoned business valuation expert who is adept at navigating the complex authorities in action during these transfers.

off

Other Services

Our attorneys can help you with more than quality legal services. We can help value your business and resolve your disputes.

Testimonials

President, CAD Solution Provider “I believe Mr. Ness and his services have contributed to the success of my business over the years."
More